Tag Archives: tourism myanmar

Blissed out on silver sands: Myanmar’s Ngwe Saung beach

Published in the November edition of My Magical Myanmar

Ngwe Saung's ponies appear at sunset
Ngwe Saung’s ponies appear at sunset

For those of us who find it hard to do nothing in this “always online” world, Ngwe Saung Beach is a really good place to practise the art of just being. Its unspoiled 14 kilometre stretch of ngwe saung (silver sands) hugs the Bay of Bengal’s turquoise waters, which practically cry out for a wading. While being less of a budget destination than nearby Chaungtha Beach, it attracts fewer visitors and has more of a laid back vibe: some say it’s the most tranquil spot in Myanmar.

Ngwe Saung Beach is located 260 kilometres west of Yangon and the five hour journey into Ayeyarwady Division concludes with 88 continuous curves: getting there feels a bit like slipping down a long bit of spaghetti. Hiring a car without a driver is inadvisable, as the two-lane road is best left navigated by someone familiar with its twists and turns as well as local driving customs, the latter of which I surmised as complex, cooperative and honky. The bus is of course another option and once there, motorcycles can be hired for a full day or on a jump-on, jump-off basis. However it’s likely that the only land commutes during your stay at Ngwe Saung will involve travelling from an upscale hotel in the northern side to the south, the latter of which is simply referred to by locals as “The Village.” The string of seafood restaurants along Myoma Road serve up crab, squid, lobster and octopus and are so cheap you’ll think you’ve ordered chips. It’s also a great place to buy local handicrafts, hire snorkel gear or book a guided boat trip for sea fishing, snorkelling and island hopping. “The Village” also offers cheaper accommodation options.

Paradise found
Paradise found

Lovers’ Island is located at the far northern end of Ngwe Saung and it’s well worth making the minimal effort required to visit it – particularly as the sweeping panoramic view from the top is picture postcard perfect. At low tide the waters are ankle deep and crossing from the shore takes just a couple of minutes, whilst at high tide it’s never more than chest deep.

Atop one of the rocky outcrops sits a mermaid, while most others are covered with greenish-brown crabs scrabbling to find a nook. The surrounding waters contain enough underwater life to lose at least an hour or two snorkelling, but sadly there’s also the occasional bit of litter floating about. Should the sea fishermen at the northern point of the island arouse your curiosity as to their catch, take care while meandering over because the rocks are deceptively slippery: I wasn’t the only one to go home that day with a barnacle-inflicted injury.

Grab a rubber ring and bring out your inner child
Grab a rubber ring to bring out your inner child

Though the origins of the island’s name are uncertain, it’s certainly apt: local couples arrive in droves at sunset and many linger there past dusk. Enterprising vendors on both the island and the shore sell coconut juice and chilled bottles of Myanmar beer. Further down the beach, ponies decorated with neon tassels also appear once the sun’s rays have softened.

Ngwe Saung is by no means a place to party on into the night: there’s an acoustic band that plays every evening at the chic but cheap Royal Flower Restaurant on Myoma Road, but virtually nothing else exists by way of entertainment. However as most hotels, including those over $100 a night, lack 24 hour electricity supplies, it’s wiser to tuck in early to avoid feeling hot and groggy when the AC cuts out at around 6am. Internet connections at hotels and restaurants vary from the spotty to the non-existent: whilst this can be inconvenient, it’s also part of what makes Ngwe Saung a place of virtually uninterrupted peace.

Chasing a Lonely Planet cover in Shan State’s Inle Lake

Published in Mizzima Business Weekly on 24 April 2014

An Intha fisherman on Inle Lake
An Intha fisherman on Inle Lake

For the younger generation of world travellers, there is one item they cannot do without – a Lonely Planet guide. Although Myanmar still lacks a reputation as a budget destination as compared to its Southeast Asian neighbours, the country is nevertheless attracting an increasing number of backpackers who are keen to visit a country which was closed off from the world for so many years. Few of these self-respecting young foreign tourists doing the rounds in Myanmar would be seen without a copy of this trusted guide – particularly as online information is relatively scarce and can be time-consuming to access due to slow internet speeds. And which image was considered alluring enough to be featured on the cover of Lonely Planet’s 2011 edition? A fisherman standing on his traditional boat on Inle Lake. Its allure makes it impossible to travel to Inle Lake without trying to snap a shot of this symbol of life in Shan State.

A floating home on Inle Lake
A floating home on Inle Lake

The lake is one of Myanmar’s top tourist draw cards – so much so that if I had a kyat for every time I’d been asked whether I’d been there, I’d have at least a thousand more to my name than I do right now. Over time, the omission became something of an embarrassment, particularly after admitting I’d been living in Myanmar for more than 18 months. Envy also kicked in: I’d heard story after story about the lake’s scenic splendour, the fascinating cultural mix of the area’s indigenous groups and the laid back vibe of Nyaung Shwe, where everyone but the high-end travellers stay.

So finally, in January this year, my husband and I booked flights to the “Big Two” – Bagan and Inle Lake, Lonely Planet guides in hand. 

Obviously my expectations were extremely high – to the point of thinking it inevitable I’d be let down. After a few dusty but enchanting days zooming about Bagan’s temples on electric bicycles, we somewhat nervously boarded an Air KBZ flight to Heho Airport, which is located about an hour from Nyaung Shwe. The airport is notoriously difficult for landing because it’s located in mountainous terrain and the landing strip is short – factors considered attributable to Air Bagan’s fatal accident on Christmas Day 2012. However I was comforted by the fact that the aircraft, which carries around 70 passengers, was obviously a far newer model than that which we’d travelled to Bagan with Air Mandalay (it had ashtrays in the toilets). Nevertheless it was still something of a relief to step off the plane in Heho and breathe in the cool, crisp morning air – which I soon discovered drops to a downright chilly 14 degrees Celsius at night in the peak season of December and January.

Tourists zoom back to Nyaung Shwe after a day out on the lake
Tourists zoom back to Nyaung Shwe after a day out on the lake

Most trips to explore Inle Lake begin around 8am, but it’s also possible to hire a boat at any time of day, for as many hours as you wish. Having arrived around noon, our first venture on the lake took place just before sunset. Our guides were a friendly Intha father and son – although their English was limited, the teenage son was able to communicate the basics – and most often the scenery spoke for itself.

The Inthas are a predominantly Buddhist Tibeto-Burman ethnic group and are thought to have migrated from Dawei to Inle Lake back in the 14th century. Legend has it that two Intha brothers were summoned to serve a Shan chieftain, who was so taken with their work ethic that he invited another 36 families to follow them. Today the Inthas number around 70,000 and speak a Burmese dialect. “Intha” translates to “sons of the lake” – along with fishing and tourism, tending floating gardens is a common form of livelihood for the Intha people.

Be prepared to bargain hard if you'd like to own something as beautiful as this!
Be prepared to bargain hard if you’d like to own something as beautiful as this!

As the sun’s rays slowly turned into shades of muted pinks and mauves and we donned the woollen blankets offered to guard against the chilly winds, our guide pointed out half a dozen fisherman on boats a hundred or so metres away. The Intha’s unique rowing style involves wrapping one leg around a paddle (creating a silhouette that bears a slight resemblance to a wooden-legged pirate), and it has become one of Myanmar’s most iconic sights. An Intha fisherman is also featured on the cover of Lonely Planet, which must be at least part of the reason why virtually every tourist visiting Inle Lake is determined to take home some of their own photographs of the famed sight. Sure enough, we saw about 40 tourists in motor-powered boats snapping away with glee.

“If you want to get closer you’ll need to pay [the fishermen] a tip,” said our guide, before hinting that posing for pictures has become so lucrative that for some, it’s trumped the pursuit of fishing itself.

As if on cue, a handful of the fishermen lifted their cylindrical nets by their legs and extended the oars in perfect unison – but held the pose for less than five seconds.

The incredible floating villages of Inle Lake, Shan State
The incredible floating villages of Inle Lake, Shan State

The following morning we returned to the lake for a full day excursion with our guides – which is great value at a little over $30 for two people. We sped along the vast waters, which are 22km long by 10km wide and flanked by mountains either side. We slowed down to navigate through the narrow spaces left by fertile reeds and I gazed in amazement at the communities of stilted homes, most of which are fragile structures of thatched bamboo and others of more robust but rusted metal sheeting.

A little girl waves hello
A little girl waves hello

Inle Lake has a countless number of floating villages, floating gardens and markets, the latter of which offer everything from stunning silver jewellery, Shan parchments, parasols, ox bone spoons and spices – but be prepared to bargain because trade is largely geared towards tourists. There are also monasteries and atmospheric stupas, such as Shwe Inn Thein Paya, which has hundreds of densely packed stupas, both ruined and vigorously restored.

Nga Hpe Kyaung Monastery is made entirely of wood and has a huge meditation hall featuring Shan, Tibetan, Bagan and Ava style statues. It was built in 1853, four years before the construction of Mandalay Palace began. In recent years the monastery gained fame for its cats, which were trained by a monk to jump through hoops (and were amply rewarded for doing so). However according to our guide, the monk passed away last year and the unusual spectacle is no more, as the other monks aren’t as keen on cat tricks. Nonetheless the monastery has retained its plentiful feline population and it’s amusing to watch scores of tourists avidly taking their portraits.

A Pa-O woman at a spice market
A Pa-O woman at a spice market

Most boat trips return to Nyaung Shwe around 4pm, so a pleasant way to pass the time before an evening meal is to try a traditional Intha massage at Win, which is on Shwe Chan Thar Street and costs just K5,000 for an hour. It’s family-run and massages are performed in a breezy bamboo hut, with Shan tofu crackers, coconut cookies and green tea served afterwards. Intha massage is quite gentle in comparison to the traditional Burmese style, although those who prefer a firmer touch need only request it.

Having read in Lonely Planet Myanmar that “Nyaung Shwe’s culinary scene doesn’t quite live up to its atmosphere,” it was a pleasant surprise to stumble upon a Japanese restaurant located just around the corner from Aung Mingalar Hotel ($50 per night). The chef is of Japanese descent and the ramen was as good as I’ve ever tasted. With the exception of an Italian restaurant called Golden Kite (which boasts authentic wood-fired pizzas), every restaurant we dined at was established too recently to have been listed in the 2011 edition ofLonely Planet. Two establishments stood out among the rest – the first was Everest 2, which is run by a family descended from Pokhara in Nepal. While its biryiani was disappointing, the thali was memorable and the chai divine.

Cute!
Cute!

The French Touch is located on a side street called Kyaung Taw Shayt Street, but its bright orange outside decor is impossible to miss from the main road of Yong Gyi, which leads to the canal from where boat trips are booked. It boasts a bakery, restaurant, free wifi and even a spa. The pizzas are large and its host of cocktails, including its trademark “Frenchtouchtini”, makes it an excellent spot for a sunset cocktail, which will more than likely morph into an after dark dinner. When I accidently dropped my third martini, the shards of glass were swept up with an understanding smile and a fresh replacement was delivered to the table before I could even offer a proper apology.

Padaung tribeswomen weaving silk
Padaung tribeswomen weaving silk

Although there’s no longer a shortage of options serving international cuisine, sampling Shan food is a must. Aurora Restaurant on Yong Gyi Street serves up delicious, hearty meals which often feature a base of stewed tomatoes, which I chose to have accompanied with chunks of potatoes and melt-in-your-mouth slices of eggplants. It’s also perfect if you’re on a tight budget, as prices are about K3,000 for a main meal.

As an ever-increasing number of tourists visit Inle Lake, some are concerned that it will soon lose some of its charms and become far more commercialised than it is today. Personally, I have my doubts, as the area itself is so vast and the sights so plentiful – but regardless, anyone who hasn’t yet been is missing out – just as I (eventually) discovered.

The world’s most under-rated beach: Ngapali in Myanmar

The UK magazine Wanderlust recently named Myanmar as it’s top tourist destination, yet after spending five days at Ngapali Beach I’m still surprised by how (pleasantly) quiet it was. Most people don’t associate Myanmar with Hawaii-toppping beaches and gorgeous resorts, so to address this I decided to post a few photos – and let you be the judge! I’ll add a little bit of commentary along the way…

My husband, in paradise
My husband, in paradise

Despite the hype about Myanmar as the new “it” destination, there’s not another soul on the beach, as you can see. The snorkelling was amazing – both at the rocks close to shore, jumping off a boat (great fishing too) and on a nearby island. Rumour has it that ‘Ngapali’ got its name from a sailor homesick for Napoli…

IMG_7254

Happy Hour on Ngapali Beach means two hours of half priced drinks, from 5pm – 7pm. Before dusk, the sun is a huge ball of electric pink fury and when it finally dips out of view, the lights on the squid fishing boats twinkle on the horizon. Very romantic. Every cocktail imaginable is on offer and the restaurants (such as Ngapali Bar) that aren’t attached to a hotel are super cheap. My husband ordered a barracuda that was so big it was chopped in half and brought out on two plates – and it cost about 3000 kyat (US$3.40). I ate seafood at every meal for five days…

Luxurious living
Luxurious living

This is a bedroom at Amata Resort and Spa – there was also an adjoining living area with a television, fridge, desk and so forth. The room was flanked by bamboo trees and a gecko the size of a football ran across the window at night once (a true beefcake). Other than a push-mower and a fishing boat, I never heard the sound of anything with a motor. It’s subliminal relaxation at its best. The service at Amata was faultless. The massages were expensive so I can’t vouch for them, but I’d be surprised if they weren’t awesome. There are some cheaper options (under $100 a night) closer to Thandwe airport. A friend also recommends Oliver’s Resort.

Amata's swimming pool
Amata’s swimming pool

I never got enough of this – after an afternoon of swimming, my husband and I relaxed in here until happy hour. And the hotel’s breakfast was as good as this looks!

No fighting over sun lounges
No fighting over sun lounges

Just to reiterate that crowds aren’t a problem in Ngapali.

Lazy and active as you like it
As lazy or active as you like it

Renting a fishing boat for a four hour trip to a nearby island – stopping along the way for fishing and snorkelling and a bbq fish lunch (the fishermen were generous with their catch because we caught one small fish between us) costs K25,000 ($28). It’s also possible to hire one person or two person kayaks – the tide is gentle so it’s an easy spin.

Ngapali Beach
Ngapali Beach

It’s not deserted by any stretch (pardon the pun) but this here looks like an under-rated beach. And it’s just a 40 minute flight from Yangon.

The cliche sunset shot
The cliche sunset shot

Please, put Ngapali Beach on your bucket list – I couldn’t think of a better ending for a holiday in Myanmar.