A letter from a reader of The Independent

Published in The Weekend Independent Magazine, 2 July 2010

Jessica Mudditt: A beam of light

Sir,

Being a reader of “The Weekend” has always made me proud. Unlike other weekend magazines, this one is worth reading while relaxing on a Friday morning with breakfast served on bed. Sir, my main intention of writing to you was to talk about Jessica Mudditt, a successful writer of your magazine. When I read her article “Investigating youth”, I realized that this piece of work might not be as vital as other recent news’, like the “Neemtoli Tragedy” and other disasters, but Sir, with all due respect I would rather expect articles like these – Investigating youth – in a weekend magazine than serious ones. We see, read and hear about news everyday. But, information like these tend to get lost. To some journalists, they are “important” enough. Apart from me, I can guarantee you that there are a lot of readers out there who expect entertaining yet informative news in “The Weekend”. Sir, Jessica Mudditt is a writer who actually can bring about a change in the definition of “news”. I am truly satisfied by her writing style and her way of describing matters. I wish Jessica Mudditt best of luck and would be more happier if she provides the readers with articles such as this one and of course, thanks to you sir for introducing writers like her by which our young generation can be inspired to write.

Irtiza Gulshan, Dhaka.

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Jessica Mudditt is an Australian freelance journalist whose articles have been published by The Economist, BBC, CNN, Marie Claire, GQ and Australian Geographic.

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Excerpt

“I squeezed Sherpa’s hand one last time before reluctantly letting go. Our eyes locked for a second and we mouthed a quick “I love you” – the most affection it was appropriate to show in the conservative Buddhist country. I wanted to run a hand through his mop of curly black hair but he was already walking away from me.”